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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
mission. the senior sa senior advisor sae noticed the pope slowing down. we watched pope john paul ii suffer through the last few years of his papacy. maybe he wanted to avoid that. the former cardinal joseph ratzinger was touched by the charges of child abuse in the catholic church. bill: what happens next on the dates that are aren't? >> reporter: he's leaving february 28, 8:00 p.m. local time in rome. that leaves that very important vacancy and sets up a conclave of cardinals. vatican says by mid-march at the latest. vatican says we should have a new pope by esther sunday march 31. pope benedict will not take part in the conclave. usually a conclave happens after a pope dies. 1415 was the last time a pope quit in office. who is the next pope? he could come from developing areas of the world. it guarantees a lot of drama and a lot of black or white smoke coming from the roof is sistine chapel. march report concerns about the pope's health surfaced this past christmas eve. have it can watchers say he looked frail as he delivered the midnight mass. here he is riding in a motorized car
, a globe-trotting predecessor, pope john paul ii, but pope benedict rose to the occasion, tacking trips to cube barks the united states, europe, the middle east, he really got around and got his message out, and he was very fond of keeping. he is a teacher, an intellectual so he tried to get his message to as many people as possible, from the very young to the very old. this last day in office will be february 28th. then there will be a conclave of cardinals and it's expected that position will be in the position in time to conduct an easter service. greg? >> amy kellogg, live in rom. >>> at catholics the world over react to this news, some are already looking at the legacy pope benedict will leave behind. most in the church view the pontiff as a conservative. not in favor of vary men reforms. he'll also be remembered as the church's leader during the child bows scandal that rocked the world. he apologized for the years of decades by priest, even meeting with the victims. >> joining us now with analysis, former fox news correspondent and now the vatican senior communications advisor,
ornamental gardens, as a small farm. john paul ii took wonderful walks here. benedict xvi i'm told is a much, much more private man, expected to spend a long time in his rooms here. he'll be here for about two months while they restore his home at the vatican where he will eventually spend the rest of his life. guys? >> all right, becky anderson, thank you very much. we'll check back in with you. >>> here to help us walk through today is monsignor rick hi hillgartner. i wanted to walk through what is going to happen today when the pope meets with the cardinals. can you walk us through that? >> sure. >> yesterday in st. peter's square there were upwards of 50,000 people or more giving that public witness. this will be the most with his closest collaborators over the years. the pope's personal collaborators are the bishops throughout the world and in a particular way it's the cardinals standing at the heart of those, many of the cardinals of the people who workday to day in the vatican who work with the pope on a regular basis. who see him week in, week out. the rest of the cardinals spread th
-to-day basis. i think we would be looking for vigorous and dynamic leadership, perhaps in the mold of john paul ii. >> archbishop of milan, the archbishop of vienna, gmt enoa, italy, two vatican cardinals in the mix, do you agree with the monsignor about the qualities of what needs to be considered as we look to who would take benedict's place? >> yes, i think the monsignor is absolutely -- as somebody who has studied this, the church has become quite diverse. while there's been a decline of things catholic in places like the united states, that is not the case in places like africa, latin, central america, central mexico. the activity has quite energized, so make a prediction that you'll see a greater voice of those communities, nigeria, brazil, mexico, because the catholic church and the conclave in particular has become more diversified over the years. don't forget john paul ii was the first known italian in 453 years, nobody ever believed that, so here we are 2013, and you might see a seismic change again. >> ray flynn, monsignor tom mcsweeny, thank you for joining me. i really appreciate i
pastor and we got that with john paul who also, by the way had pretty good managerial skills. we got with pope benedict xvi a brilliant mind and ability to teach and preach. now i hear some of my brother cardinals say, but we should also look for somebody with some pretty good managerial skills to bring the roman curia as an agent of evangelization and not to -- so if that means some type of renewal, if that needs some type of attention, so be it. >> reporter: as one cardinal put it to me scott, there's so many things needed in the new pope that it would be almost impossible to find it all in one man, but they do know that they need to deal with the mess that is the roman catholic curia at the moment, the church governance and also the ongoing problem of the sex abuse scandal. that is going to weigh heavily on the new pope scott. >> alan thank you very much. the banner that we see there says pope benedict thank you and we love you. the people that we saw gathering outside the papal apartments in san de maso courtyard are some of the folks who have worked for the p
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
. that pope john paul ii really needed him and wanted him around and discouraged him from those very thoughts. it is said that he will be leaving that congregation of cloistered nuns in the vatican. there he will pray and probably write. bill. >> bill: amy kellogg, thank you. reportingreporting from rome lie tonight in that fox report. president obama's offering appreciation and prayers for the pope. now he and the first lady have warm memories of their meeting with the holy father in 2009 at the time a spokesman said the pope was very impressed with the president and for his part the president said he looked forward to a very strong relationship between the united states and the vatican. today, the president said in part, quote: the church plays a critical role in the united states and the world and i wish the best of those who will soon gather to choose his holiness pope benedict the xvith successor. house speaker john boehner said the prayers and gratitude of american catholics are with pope benedict xvi today. our team fox coverage continues. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hun
the hottest sellers so far. and while pope benedict may be in the spotlight, pope john paul ii merchandise is the favorite among shoppers. he was certainly a favorite and on many people's minds. >> i was in rome, and the line was so long, and i didn't want to wait in line. >> amazon. >> that's true. you can order anything. >> can you get anything on that site. >>> time for an early look at what's coming up ahead and a look back. senators who disagree with the president on how to overhaul immigration will take their ideas to the top. nbc news has learned that republican senators john mccain and lindsey graham will head to the white house later today for talks on immigration. today marks the 20th anniversary of the deadly world trade center attack of 1993. six people were killed and more than 1,000 were injured when a bomb in the parking garage of the world trade complex. the bomb left a crater 60 feet wide and caused a collapse of several steel-reinforced concrete floors in the vicinity of that explosion. >>> on a much lighter note, singer michael bolton turns 60 years old today. >>> all da
's -- he succeeded pope john paul ii who was extremely popular and who reigned for over 20 years and did extensive amounts of traveling endured especially by young -- endeared especially by young people and there was an assassination attempt on him and he forgave the person who wanted it three to -- who wanted to try to shoot hill. it's been an interesting reign for the pope. it's just about to end. >> they say many at the vatican were stunned by the news he was resigning. there were others who saw it as a sign of humility and humanity, a fact that he was being rationle that he didn't feel he would -- rational, that he didn't feel he would do the job anymore. >> and there were concerns that he couldn't deal with some of the scandals that started to rock the catholic church. he just maintained it was for his health and purely humble reasons that he wanted to step down and step april side. once again, a -- aside. once again a beautiful picture from the helipad. which i guess you don't see very often outside of the vatican, outside of the walls of vatican. >> as we watch these live picture,
for -- as someone put it, i think -- a cardinal who is the secretary of pope john paul ii is now the archbishop of poland. they said, why didn't he resign when he was old in sick, he said, he continue come down off the cross. there is a lot to be said forbearing one's burden to the end. but i do think that it's been hundreds of years since the last pope resigned. i wouldn't be surprised if we saw it happen again in the next hundred years. his resignation i think in service of the church has actually said this is an act of humility. people talk about how can one give up such a big and important and powerful position, i think there is also another way that this is humble, it's not lost upon the pope that in stepping down it may be perceived that this is an act of weakness or abandonment and i think that probably in many ways for this man, being sort of the kind, gentleman he is was probably more difficult for him than walking away from all the trappings of the papacy. jenna: your quick thoughts on the legacy he leaves behind. >> there are two things he'll be remembered for. one it's bringing the
remember how pope john paul ii was so young when he was elected. i think he was 56 or 57. a young man. >> he used to go skiing all the time. >> he was elected when he was 78 years old. >> yeah. so we watched him turn into an elderly man that was very frail. remember how long it took, we waited and waited. i can remember i was on a plane when he finally passed. but he didn't -- i mean, he was not healthy at the end and he didn't resign. so that's what i don't really understand, ross, right? >> well, traditionally, they haven't resigned. so -- >> 1415, yeah. >> so he's 2005, he's 86. so that's five, six, seven, eight -- >> i think what we're all dancing around the issue of whether or not there's more to it, right? is that what we're getting at? >> is there something else we don't know about. >> all of them have gotten elderly and they have essentially died in office and that's when they begin to look for a new pope. that is no happening in this case. >> right. you said it would be pure speculation. it's probably best not to specula speculate, at least you filled us in that at this point
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
, at the beginning of the papacy of john paul ii. one of of the reasons it's in a better place today is because of pope benedict. who as cardinal ratzinger, he didn't get it at the beginning, but he listened and he learned and he pushed and he threw hundreds of priests out -- bad priests out of the priesthood. so the church is in a much better position today. mostly due to pope benedict than it was in the past. >> yeah, a lot of -- great to get your thoughts. a lot of people, of course, would disagree and still a lot of angst and a lot of people who say that the pontiff was stymied at attempts for reform. we will see what happens the next time around. we do appreciate your thoughts. reverend thomas reese, jesuit priest. thanks for your time today. >>> the last week and a half we have heard blt murder allegations against oscar pistorius, but he is not the only family member who's now in trouble. >> carl pistorius is facing homicide charges. all about a traffic accident. we'll have that story coming up. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealma
celebration, he did look weaker and weaker, but then he again he is an 85-year-old man. john paul ii before him was even in worse shape and he did not resign. nobody was really expecting him to resign or abdicate, as was said in a previous conversation. so, it did come as a surprise, for sure. we have, just right here at the vatican right now in st. peter's square, there are a few faces that express his belief when asked what the cameras are all about. i'm telling them that the pope is about to resign. nobody can really believe that because that is unprecedented in modern times. there was a pope in the 13th century that resigned but certainly this hasn't happen ed >> there is concern that this is more than just a pope aging, that there are more health concerns. have you heard anything like that? >> reporter: there are a lot of allegations, of course, in the house of pope benedict xvi, a lot of rumors going around in the past few months that he wasn't doing so well. but as usual as ever with the vatican, it's always very fickle to get complete and full survey on the actual health of the pope
, john allen, who's one of the more perceptive ones. he said the legacy of john paul ii we're not going to fully appreciate until years from now and one of benedict's main job is going to be to help us unpack that ponticate. so they're going to be voluminous but it will take a while. i can rattle a few off. >> reporter: give me two. >> i would say the deep theological pro fundity than been expressed with amazing clarity and child-like simplicity. and second i would say his constant call that the church needs to be engaged with the world in culture. you know, christiane, there's some voices in the church today saying we need to retreat to the cat combs. we need to circle the wagons. ben xvi said the church is in the world. there's tons more if you ever want to invite me back. we'll go through his accomplishments. thank you, good to be with you. >> reporter: cardinal dolan, thank you very much for joining us. back to you, chris and erin. >> what a great interview, first of all. kudos for christiane. for people watching all over the world, you just got a look at what makes cardinal dolan s
when pope john paul died he was 85 years old. the current pope is 85 as well and if you reach a certain age and you cannot function. you should step down and give way to younger people. no american has ever been picked as polk. why no mechanism to this code?. it is unlikely to happen here because it would give too much power the united states. that history is shown us he believes the cardinals will look some roast. that broke saturday. the red cross is helping 22 people find shelter after a deadly fire on treasure island. this apartment caught fire around 12:30 saturday morning. five people escaped one of the units, but not this little girl. seen here in a blue tank top, 10-year-old corn-lina godfrey died in the fire. neighbors whose apartments burned say their loss is not comparable to the girl's family. >> "the story really speaks for itself.it's horrible." it took firefighters nearly two hours to get the flames investigators are still trying to determine the cause. in the meantime, the red cross is working with catholic charities on new housing for the displaced residents. >> oppone
and pope john paul ii. you can see who pope benedict chose for whatever reasons. i don't think he has a favorite. and he's certainly not going to show that he has a favorite in these days. >> okay. greg burke, thanks very much for your insight. elizabeth? >> unchartered territory. >>> turning, now, to the latest on that frantic manhunt for the rogue expolice officer, christopher dorner, on the run right now. we showed you the surveillance video that surfaced overnight. could it be a clue to where he is at this moment? abc's pierre thomas is tracking the latest on this story. in los angeles. pierre, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, elizabeth. it's becoming clear dorner could be anywhere. and this morning, there's evidence the hunt for him has gone international. overnight, police conducted a raid at this hotel in tijuana, mexico. they apparently found no evidence he was there. but for days, customs officials have been hunting for dorner along the southern border. and there's new details this morning about dorner's possible movements in the days before the shootings. tmz obtaine
the memory of benedict's predecessor, john paul ii. have a listen to this. >> people said, if anyone should have resigned, it was he. parkinson parkinson's, couldn't get around. i think it is the image, the visual image of a man incapacitated. people say, well, how much is he really doing that? how much does he have his hands on the pulse of what is happening? >> chris cuomo this morning. father, do you think just straight up do you think his successor might find wisdom in the notion of hanging it up early, maybe set a precedent here? >> i agree with the quotations of the priest. we need a person, a leader, a real leader with good health, a wise man, continuing to train and i agree with benedict sistine and he has few guideline -- very clear, if i don't have the health, spirituality, mentality, and everything, i will resign. and it is simple for us. the doctrine is continuing to be the same. i think it is an example for everybody, the leader, the church, continuing. it is much better. resign now. >> italian popes, think of polish, currently german. looking at the statistics and the numbers
in the developed world. the italians had a claim on the papacy a long time until john paul the iind now, they had a poll and german in the seat and i imagine they would be interested having it back in italy. at the same time, there is very good talent outside europe that might be able to lead the church. i think they'll look widely but won't be simply geographical, what kind of vision will they have going forward and considerations of age and health obviously in this case. i think all those will be on the table. >> they say you want to live in interesting times. certainly, we all are going to get a chance to watch how the pope's voice is absorbed into this discussion by the conclave, right? how much of a voice will he have in this? >> caller: i suspect he will have very little or none. if he's prudent, i don't think he will try to appoint his own successor, let the cardinals choose one of their own because they have to live with the decision. this is an unprecedented situation. popes don't generally pick their successors and i don't think he will. my suspicion is he will retreat from the process
is his humility. he almost shrugged and said compared to john paul ii, he said, boy, i don't know if i'm up for this but i'll given it a shot. he's winsome in his frailness and humanity. >> and such humanity covering this story, that he was getting his arms around. he took us to rome and vatican. we were there in june of 2011. his love for not only the man but his institution. it was evident then. >> he took us around and gave us a tour i will never forget. >> anyway, we hope to be spend a lot of time with cardinal dolan over the coming weeks. we thank him for coming by this morning. >> one of the many people adjusting to this news. let's turn to george weigel. it's good to see you. >> hi, savannah, how are you? >> very well. this is being framed as an act of great humility. you have to go back to the middle ages to find somebody that add voe indicated the papacy in this matter. what do you think the legacy of pope benedict will be? >> i think pope benedict is the greatest preacher in the world today. he has a remarkable capacity to express the beautiful truth of the christian faith in
grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thankso professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaki
the senate took up that same bill and even though it was hand-crafted by john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, minority leader mitch mcconnell and 32 other republican senators opposed it. mcconnell's office released a statement saying leader mcconnell and other senate republicans had several amendments aimed forcing washington to cut government spending, but all were defeated by democrats. as a result, the leader simply couldn't support the bill. the word on capitol hill is that mcconnell's no vote was meant to appease his unruly kentucky constituents. perhaps angered over mcconnell's compromise on the fiscal cliff made last month with vice president joe biden. that deal averted a potential downgrade of america's credit rating. speaker boehner's bill to extend the debt limit did much the same, but for the extreme right wing flank of the gop, supporting two bills to prevent possibly catastrophic damage to the u.s. economy is perhaps one bill too far. glen, we talk a lot about the tunnel that ends in heart break that the gop may or may not be hurdling down, but these votes lately on the hi
of fun. >> when we come back, the clock is ticking till midnight. we'll head to washington and ask john harwood about the latest negotiations right after this. later this morning, a cnbc exclusive house chairman paul ryan will be joining us live at 8:00 eastern time. it's the first time we'll be talking to him since the election. first, though, take a look at yesterday's winners and losers. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real business. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. th
, though, paul, the house has nothing to do with the cabinet nominations, you know the advice and consent is totally in the senate. chuck hagel, john brennan none of them, none of them have to be approved by the house. this is strictly a senate job. >> i realize that. i am saying, you know, why should he fight against the filibuster when there is nothing -- it's not going to get through the house. >> you fight against the filibuster, paul, to make the senate work. they should still be doing their job and then, you know maybe we would fix the house, too. although the house is operating under this hastert rule. it's the house equivalent of the filibuster. but i don't think -- i appreciate the call, paul. i don't think you can let harry reid off of the hook by saying action well, nothing would get through the house anyway. this nomination did not have to get through the house. can't use that excuse here bill is in newport richie florida. what do you say? >>. >> good morning. how are you? >> bill: good. thanks. >> caller: you made a comment about the system i
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)